data Tag

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IT HAS BECOME CLEAR THAT ALL BUSINESSES, TO VARYING DEGREES of urgency, have a need for real-time insights across their critical processes, products, and people — both internal and external. Manufacturing 4.0 (M4.0), which is anchored primarily in interconnectivity, automation,

There are several advantages of using an industrial data platform. They include: 1. Consolidated Data: In a data platform, data is consolidated in one place in the cloud. This consolidation means all databases can use the same service to render insights

Up until recently, there have been two options for handling data on the edge: 1. Send raw data to the cloud where it can be stored and analyzed; or 2. Discard the data. Sending all the raw data to cloud

Electricity is fundamental to our society. As climate change becomes more severe and demand for clean energy increases, the future is the electrification of everything and along with it, the need for reliable energy. The U.S. infrastructure spans over a

Where and when should a utility trim vegetation near power lines to best reduce the risk of wildfires? When is the most cost-effective time to take a wind turbine out of service for general maintenance? How can customers be convinced

Cloud adoption has risen rapidly over the past 10 years, with 92% of enterprise business strategies now relying on the cloud, according to an IDG survey. The manufacturing industry, in particular, is almost as high at 87%. However, most cloud

Virtually every vehicle that is put out into the market is equipped with almost a hundred ECUs, millions of lines of code, and a slew of technical capabilities. These innovations are making cars around the world more secure and drastically

You’ve probably heard about new technologies that are reshaping the way we work and live, like 5G and the Internet of Things (IoT), but have you noticed how data is the common denominator among those technologies? The lines between digital

What should IoT 2.0 look like? The phrase data rich and information poor (DRIP) was first used in the 1983 best-selling business book, In Search of Excellence, to describe organizations rich in data, but lacking the processes to produce meaningful information and